St Etienne
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Bob Stanley (left) lets his love of pop shine via in St Etienne, who flip 27 this yr

Each time a rock star dies (and, let’s face it, it is occurred rather a lot just lately) a number of trusted books get grabbed off the BBC bookshelves for a hastily-written obituary.

They embrace basic tomes just like the Guinness E book of Hit Singles and Colin Larkin’s peerless Encyclopaedia of Fashionable Music, however they have been joined just lately by Bob Stanley’s Yeah Yeah Yeah.

Filled with anecdotes and insights (he describes Berlin-era David Bowie as “a silent film ghost”), it displays pop via the prism of the charts, rejecting the “rockist” perspective of most reference books.

“A movie is not essentially extra pleasing if it is based mostly on a real story,” Stanley explains. “Likewise, a tune is not essentially any higher or any extra heartfelt, or convincing, as a result of it was written by the singer.”

Though Yeah Yeah Yeah ends in 2000, Stanley had already give you chapter headings for the subsequent instalment, together with the improbable “Oops I Did It Once more and Once more”, concerning the Swedish hit manufacturing unit behind Britney Spears, Taylor Swift and Justin Timberlake.

So it is a shock to find his subsequent e-book will not cope with grime, crunk or EDM – however massive bands, ragtime and jazz.

Known as Too Darn Scorching: The Story of Fashionable Music, it is an try and make sense of the 50-year interval between the appearance of recorded music and the beginning of rock and roll.

“It is the basic case of, ‘if you cannot discover the e-book you need to learn, write it your self,'” explains Stanley.

“There are many books on jazz or the nice American songbook – however a few of these genres have forceful advocates, who see their music as the music of the period and fully ignore Broadway or Hollywood musicals. So I actually need to tie all of it collectively”.

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Bing Crosby revolutionised the sound of recorded music, because of his distinctive microphone approach

Final time round, Stanley was immersed within the music he was describing. He began his profession on the NME and Melody Maker, earlier than forming his personal group, St Etienne, because the bodily embodiment of his pop obsession – mixing 60s woman group harmonies with parts of people, home, dub and northern soul.

His data of pop’s pre-history is altogether extra sketchy.

“I am actually ranging from a place of realizing nothing concerning the music, aside from the requirements which everybody is aware of,” he says. ” However studying issues as I am going is fascinating and terrific.”

He just lately found how Bing Crosby’s intimate, laid-back supply on songs like White Christmas was solely made potential by the appearance of electrical microphones (beforehand, singers like Al Jolson had been vaudeville “belters”, screaming down the rafters so as to be heard).

“No one might have recorded a voice that gentle earlier than the late 20s,” says Stanley. “After which within the late 30s, he [Crosby] funded the Ampex tape firm, gave them hundreds of kilos, and made the primary pre-recorded radio broadcast.

“He stated it was as a result of he acquired fed up of going into the studio day by day and wished to play golf. However he speeded alongside recording expertise.”

Stanley’s analysis has acquired a lift from the British Library, who’ve awarded him a £20,000 grant and a yr’s residency on the Eccles Centre – which homes the library’s assortment of American journals, newspapers and sound recordings.

“It means I will have entry to much more materials in Britain than I assumed,” says the author, “from early music magazines with wonderful names like ‘Speaking Machine Information’ to wax cylinder [recordings] and folks’s diaries.”

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The arrival of jazz torpedoed the careers of music corridor stars like George Robey

The e-book’s solely within the early phases, however he is already uncovered a number of shocking themes… together with the truth that Britain was the dominant power in pop at the beginning of the 20th Century.

“America at that time simply did not have the boldness or perception in its personal music,” he says, referencing the story of Jerome Kern, who wrote requirements like Smoke Will get In Your Eyes and A Advantageous Romance.

“As a younger songwriter, he came to visit to England and went to see the music halls. Then he went again to America and handed himself off as English as a result of that was the one method he might get his songs on Broadway,” Stanley says.

“That modified in a short time as soon as jazz got here in. There are many [British] songs about how ragtime is a joke – ‘my spouse ragged herself to loss of life’ – however music corridor acquired hit actually badly by ragtime and jazz.

“As quickly because it has the boldness, America turns into so brash, and everyone seems to be cowed by it that it looks like Britain’s doing a lame imitation of America till the Beatles.”

Know-how additionally performs an enormous position within the story – significantly with the appearance of radio within the 1920s.

“It is onerous to conceive how it might have felt, in the event you had been engaged on a farm in Iowa, to have the ability to hear a dwell broadcast of an enormous band from a ballroom in New York.

“That clearly affected what music individuals wished to hearken to, the way it was recorded, the way it was broadcast.

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Rex Shutterstock

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The sound high quality of early information lacked the depth and readability of recent vinyl – as actress Gloria Swanson apparently found

“One thing else I wasn’t conscious of was that document gamers, like within the 1990s, had been consigned to the attic. The standard on radio was so significantly better than on the 78s [early vinyl records], which all the time gave the impression of a person shouting right into a tube.

“It was solely within the late 20s and early 30s, when the recording expertise improved that individuals began getting 78s out once more.”

Stanley’s residence in North London is suffering from document gamers – a classic Dansette and a 1948 gramophone be a part of his smooth, trendy turntable amidst the neatly filed vinyl and scattered child toys of his new son, Len.

He says he intends to hearken to the songs he writes about of their authentic format, whether or not or not it’s wax cylinder or shellac discs “as a result of they might have been recorded to be performed on that format.

“It is like The Who’s singles within the 1960s. They had been made to be performed on a Dansette and that is why they sound skinny and unusual on a CD.

“So what I need to get throughout is what it was wish to dwell via that interval and the way individuals had been listening to music, and what they had been listening to.”

Writing the e-book must be slotted in round his different commitments, together with a movie concerning the jazz musician Basil Kirchin for Hull Metropolis of Tradition and a model new St Etienne album, which is due in June.

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St Etienne are attributable to tour later this yr

Known as Residence Counties, it displays the band’s experiences of rising up in Surrey and Berkshire.

The songs deal with all the things from the Enfield Poltergeist (a infamous hoax that made the nationwide press within the 1970s) to the rail drivers’ union Aslef, in addition to “teenage events and deceased pets”.

Stanley says he might miss a number of of St Etienne’s concert events as he finishes Too Darn Scorching – grimacing he remembers flying the 1,000-page manuscript for his earlier e-book on a tour of japanese Europe.

“I need to get this one finished quicker than the final, as a result of that was 5 years,” he says. “I’ve acquired the construction sorted out, and I am wanting ahead to speaking to collectors.

“It is only a query of not eager to go too far down the rabbit gap.”

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